Phillips-ism – Your value should be based on your unique abilities to be of service to yourself and to others

I sat for Joey for a couple of years. He was the sweetest child with loving parents, but saying goodbye to his blanket was tough. As time passed, he began to understand life without the blanket and I am sure as an adult, he now rarely, if ever, thinks about it. As he grew-up, Joey’s well-used blanket lost some of its value to Joey and his family because its usefulness to Joey deteriorated.

As he grew up, the well-used blanket lost some of its value to Joey and his family because its usefulness to Joey deteriorated. However, it helped him develop into the man he is today and I would bet if he would happen to see a picture of his blanket,  he would smile, as memories of his time with the blanket rushed back.

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Our interest in people and things should always be based on usefulness and authenticity and through that perspective, your value and self-worth will come to light.

This is something I learned during my recovery from the car accident. I found it was easy to complain about my how tough life can be and I wanted to discount my value because many things in my life were far less than perfect. My front yard didn’t look as good as the neighbors or the dishes would still sitting in the sink waiting for me to do them because some part of my body hurt too much. I fell into believing dirty dishes and weeds in the garden defined my value to others and my self-worth.

I was wrong.

Then I would ask myself, does any of this truly matter? I stepped back to analyze my perspective of the situation. I began asking myself, is doing the dishes a useful task for me? I determined, it keeps the house cleaner and reduces exposure to germs, but it will also increase my pain, decrease my happiness and put me at risk for additional injury. In the end, completing the task may not be as useful as it seems to be, but by asking myself the question, “Is it useful?”, I can make a proper determination about completing the task.

I learned by leaving the dishes and the weeds I would preserve my fragile health and then I could be useful in other ways to my family and community. The weeds and the dishes did not define me.

By deciding how I can be most useful to myself and to others, I can begin to see my own self-worth.

It is a process anyone can do, including you.

How can you be useful to others today?

What is one thing unique about you or the unique thing you do for yourself or for others?


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